What’s CPAPening?

I’m a dork. I admit it. Had to open the blog entry with something fun. New progress in the Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) world. Almost at the 11 month point (May 22, 2016) since the diagnosis and I’m averaging 2.5 hours a night wearing the face sucker mask. That’s over the last two weeks anyway.

That’s a real win. It’s been an uphill slog with the CPAP or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. But if you’ve been told by your partner or a medical professional you have OSA well don’t let it get you down. Don’t give up or give in. Just keep fighting. It’s worth it. The health consequence are sobering, so take it seriously. What’s more, I know it is because I’ve had a decent night sleep on three occasions. Despite the discomfort I’ve felt most nights, the ones where I made it through the night resulted in a near normal feeling of being rested. How I miss that feeling too.

I’ve been through at least three types of masks. I tried the nose plugger special, just two end caps that cover your nostrils and push the air in that way. And I’ve tried the clown nose special, also hard to get used to. Maybe I’ll go back and try them again, but I didn’t like them to begin with. I ended up settling with the full face mask. For some reason it works the best.

But the coolest thing I’ve discovered yet is Phillips Dreammapper ap (download from iTunes of Google Play) and synch it with your Philips Respironics CPAP device. It works most of the time. I only say that because the ap has received some scathing reviews online. Give it a shot anyway. If you don’t mind spending the $100 on the Bluetooth adaptor and assuming it fits your machine, you can synch your CPAP therapy progress with your iPhone or Android device. I’ve just started using mine. I like the ability to track total hours of use, how many open apnea, obstructive apnea and hypoapnea incidents I’ve had each night.

If you want to free up time used to visit your sleep technician listening to them give you your OSA stats back to you, give this ap a shot. Using your phone, the ap and the Bluetooth adaptor can improve your motivation to stick with the therapy.

Keep breathing,

Jason